HBCUs are constructing a brand new prison-to-college pipeline


His story is outstanding, however traditionally Black faculties and universities try to make it extra frequent. Across the nation, HBCUs are investing in schooling for incarcerated or previously incarcerated individuals, with the purpose of decreasing recidivism and constructing a prison-to-college pipeline.

“Our brothers and sisters behind the wall are coming residence.” says Laura Ferguson Mimms, govt director of the Tennessee Larger Training In Jail Initiative (THEI). “And over the course of three years, 47% will return to incarceration if we proceed to do precisely what we have achieved.”

A few of Dr. Stan’s college students had been additionally formally incarcerated like Rabia Qutab, seen above, who transitioned out of incarceration a few yr in the past. (Jeffrey Pierre/NPR)

Since 2011, her group has labored with Tennessee group faculties to supply diploma packages behind bars.

“After we introduce post-secondary academic choices whereas the person is incarcerated, we cut back the danger of recidivism by practically half,” she says.

HBCUs are well-positioned to assist incarcerated college students

In 2021, THEI launched its first four-year diploma program with Lane Faculty, an HBCU in Jackson, Tenn. Like lots of the oldest HBCUs, Lane was based to assist educate previously enslaved individuals. Mimms says the varsity’s historical past makes it well-positioned to assist incarcerated college students.

She remembers the primary day of Lane Faculty courses at Northwest Correctional Complicated in Tiptonville. The lecture was alleged to be on-line, however the president of Lane Faculty got here to talk to the scholars in individual. He talked concerning the historical past of the varsity and the legacy of HBCUs as a software for Black liberation. “The scholars had been completely mesmerized,” Mimms says.

Claflin College, an HBCU in Orangeburg, S.C., has seen related enthusiasm from college students.

“They’ve actually embraced this system and they’re most likely among the finest recruiters for this system,” says Vanessa Harris, director of Claflin’s prison-to-college initiative.

This system’s enrollment numbers maintain climbing. “We began final summer season with 10 college students, I’m projecting we are going to most likely be properly over 140 college students by the autumn semester,” she says.

Getting assist from somebody who has been in your footwear

Regardless that the curiosity is there, school packages in jail are exhausting to return by.

“My private expertise with increased schooling just about stopped on the door once I was incarcerated on the facility,” says Rabia Qutab, who transitioned out of incarceration a few yr in the past.

Student Rabia Qutab
Earlier than serving about 5 years at a girls’s jail in Texas, Rabia Qutab had completed a pre-med diploma and was on the brink of apply to medical faculty. She says transitioning again to life on the skin wasn’t simple. (Jeffrey Pierre/NPR)

Earlier than serving about 5 years at a girls’s jail in Texas, Qutab had completed a pre-med diploma and was on the brink of apply to medical faculty. She says transitioning again to life on the skin wasn’t simple.

“I used to be like, ‘I do know, I wish to return to high school, however how will we do that?’ Proper? Like, I wish to pursue medication, however then I’ve to fret about my file.”

She began wanting round, and located a program at Howard College that enables previously incarcerated college students to realize analysis expertise in a prime medical faculty lab, together with mentorship.

This system’s founder and director is Stanley Andrisse.

For Qutab, this system provided a method to construct her resume earlier than making use of to colleges, and get steerage instantly from Andrisse, somebody who has been in her footwear.

“You do not have numerous previously incarcerated individuals pursuing medication,” she says. But when she will do it, she is aware of it will make a distinction. The identical approach Andrisse has made a distinction for her.

She says, “I am opening doorways for individuals following me, you realize? So why not? As a result of if I do not do it, then how do I count on others to comply with that pathway?”

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see extra, go to https://www.npr.org.
FKAKIDSTVhttps://fkakidstv.com
Our names are Fareedah and Kamilah Amoo. We are seven and five year’s old sisters and live in Ontario, Canada, with our parents and little brother, Awad. We love writing stories, painting on canva, coding, reading books, and enjoying arts and crafts. Our goal is to motivate every child worldwide to read more books.

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